IEEE RO-MAN 2008 Workshop:
Towards Natural Human-Robot Joint Action

2008-08-08 Thanks to everyone for a successful workshop! The slides of most of the talks are now included below in the schedule. More information about the JAST project is available at www.euprojects-jast.net.

Location, date and time

1 August 2008, 09:00-12:45, Room "T4a" (follow the signs), Barerstrasse 21, Technische Universität München
Full schedule below (revised 2008-07-11)

Description

The success of the human species critically depends on our ability to engage in joint action. Our perceptions, decisions and behavior are tuned to that of others with whom we share beliefs, intentions and goals, and thus form a group. Studying the cognitive, neural, and communicative aspects of human-human joint action produces insights—and, often, implementable models—that can be used in building robot systems that are able to cooperate naturally and intelligently with human partners.

This workshop will bring together practitioners from two distinct research areas: those who study the cognitive, neural, and communicative aspects of human-human joint action, and those who aim to implement robot systems that are able to cooperate intelligently with a human partner. The presentations will include results from a range of human-human studies as well as descriptions of concrete human-robot systems. The overall goals of the workshop are twofold: to explore the range of phenomena found in human-human collaborative interactions, and to investigate how findings from these studies can be applied to the development of robot systems that are designed to support intelligent collaboration with humans on mutual tasks.

Intended audience

This workshop provides a venue for researchers from two very different areas to meet and to share ideas about the common topic of jointly-acting agents: the psychologists, neuroscientists, and linguists who study joint action between humans, and those who deal with building practical robot systems that should cooperate with humans.

Each of these groups can gain from interacting and sharing ideas with the other. The robot developers can use the findings from how humans co-operate with one another to design systems that are able to cooperate with humans on mutual tasks in a way that is as natural and intuitive as possible. The social scientists, on the other hand, gain by having access to systems that can act as a testbed. When testing a hypothesis, a robot system can easily and reliably be made to behave in different ways—for example, using different coordination strategies—and the success of the human-robot joint action can be compared under these different conditions.

Schedule

Each of the presentations will last approximately 20 minutes, with 5 minutes for questions and to allow laptops to be switched. The title of each talk is linked to the presentation slides (new 2008-08-08).

09:00-09:15 Introductory remarks
09:15-09:40 Bayesian goal inference in action observation by co-operating agents abstract
Raymond H. Cuijpers, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands
09:40-10:05 Human joint transportation in multi-user virtual environments
Paolo Pretto and Stephan Streuber, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany
10:05-10:30 Referring phenomena in human-human cooperative dialogue
Robin L. Hill, Human Communication Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, UK
10:30-11:00 Coffee break
11:00-11:25     Action understanding and error monitoring for human-robot interaction: A dynamic field approach
Wolfram Erlhagen, Estela Bicho, Nzoji Hipólito, and Luís Louro, University of Minho, Portugal
11:25-11:50 Cooperatively following plans in human-robot dialogue
Mary Ellen Foster, Technische Universität München, Germany
11:50-12:15 Representation of Speech and Gestures in Human-Robot Interaction abstract
Manuel Giuliani, Technische Universität München, Germany
12:15-12:45 Discussion and closing remarks

Organizers

  • Mary Ellen Foster, Informatik VI: Robotics and Embedded Systems, Technische Universität München, Germany
  • Manuel Giuliani, Informatik VI: Robotics and Embedded Systems, Technische Universität München, Germany
  • Thomas Müller, Informatik VI: Robotics and Embedded Systems, Technische Universität München, Germany
  • Markus Rickert, Informatik VI: Robotics and Embedded Systems, Technische Universität München, Germany
  • Alois Knoll, Informatik VI: Robotics and Embedded Systems, Technische Universität München, Germany